Automobile, Homeowners and Life Insurance

Automobile Insurance

Auto Insurance isn't just a good thing to have to protect you financially in the case of an accident - in many states it's required.

All of the Insurance companies we represent provide a wide range of auto Insurance products at a fair price. Your price gets even better if you qualify for any of our available discounts. When applying for auto Insurance, you're usually asked whether you want collision and/or comprehensive coverage, how high you want you’re deductible to be, what liability limits you want, and whether you want any types of optional coverage.

Coverage options:
Collision and comprehensive (other than collision) coverage’s
Collision and Comprehensive (other than collision) coverage’s pay for damage to your automobile. You can purchase either or both of these coverage’s for each vehicle you own. If you have an auto loan you may be required to purchase both.

  • Collision coverage insures you against damage to your vehicle caused during an accident.
  • Comprehensive (other than collision) coverage insures you against all other physical damage to your car caused by such events as fire, theft, flood, and vandalism.


Collision and comprehensive (other than collision) coverage usually includes a deductible, which can range from $100 to $1,000. If your car is damaged, the Insurance Company pays only for the damage in excess of the deductible you selected. The higher the deductible, the lower the premium.

Liability coverage
Liability coverage pays for injuries you cause to other people and damage you cause to other people's property when you are at fault in an automobile accident.

Medical Payments coverage
Medical Payments coverage pays medical expenses (up to a specified dollar limit) for you and passengers of your car who are injured in an automobile accident, no matter who is at fault. If you and your passengers have health Insurance, you may not need this coverage.

Personal Injury Protection
Some states require Personal Injury Protection, which is also known as No-Fault coverage. This coverage pays for things like medical and rehabilitative expenses, replacement services, and funeral expenses. It also pays for loss of income if you are injured in an auto accident and are unable to work.

Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist coverage
this coverage pays if you are injured by a person who is completely uninsured or doesn't have enough liability Insurance to cover your injuries. It also covers you if you are in an accident with a hit-and-run driver.

Optional coverage
Optional or special coverage includes extras such as towing, rental reimbursement, and roadside assistance. None of these coverage’s are required.

How much do I need?
Choosing the appropriate level of auto Insurance coverage depends on a number of factors, including assets you must protect (liability coverage), value of your vehicle (collision and comprehensive), and the amount of money you can afford to pay out-of-pocket (deductibles) and your tolerance for risk.

Homeowners Insurance

the coverage you have depends upon the type of policy you have. Unlike auto insurance, where the policies are pretty much the same, homeowners policies can be quite different, depending on the "form" number. The most common types of homeowner policies are:

  1. HO1 Basic or Standard policy
  2. HO2 Broad form
  3. HO3 Special (also called Deluxe, All Risk)
  4. HO4 Renters policy
  5. HO5 Enhanced Special Coverage
  6. HO6 Condo policy
  7. HO8 Older Home Policy


All homeowner policies are "package" policies. You get a group of coverage’s packaged into your policy for one overall premium. They include coverage on your building, your contents (furniture, clothing, etc.) and liability insurance in case you are sued, under the same policy. The property coverage is shown under Section 1, while the liability coverage is described under Section 2.

There is no better way to understand your homeowner policy than to read it! We suggest you pull out your policy and find the parts to your policy that correspond to the following explanations:

A typical policy consists of three things:
1. The Declarations Page - that declares who, what and how much you are insuring, along with the date your coverage starts and the premium.
2. The Policy Booklet - printed pages that contain the details of coverage’s and exclusions.
3. Endorsements - separate pages, usually with endorsement numbers, that change (or endorse) specific parts of the policy.
Sometimes you are only given the original policy once in the beginning, then on renewal, to cut down expenses, you are just sent the dec. page (declaration page) with the bill. It's a good idea to save the original policies should you ever need to refer to them.

More Detailed Information:

The HO1 policy is very limited in coverage and is not being sold by most companies.
The HO2 policy covers the basic perils of fire, lightning, explosion, smoke, hail, aircraft, riot, glass breakage, theft and damage caused by vehicles. It also adds additional coverage to broaden your policy. Those perils include damage caused by rupture of your water or heating pipes, falling objects (such as trees), collapse of the building, limit electrical damage to appliances and others.

The HO3 policy is, by far, the most commonly sold policy. It covers everything the HO2 policy covers and more. Instead of listing the perils that are covered these policies cover all damage to the building except what is excluded. The usual exclusions are: wear and tear, termites, rotting, collapse of septic tank, flood, war, earthquake and a few others.

Some HO3 policies are referred to as "Deluxe”, "Special”, "All Risk" policies depending upon the company.

Most policies cover your contents or belongings only for the perils named in an HO2 policy so wear and tear and normal breakage is not covered for your furniture and personal belongings.
Be careful! Your homeowner policy limits coverage on some items.

To keep the cost of insurance down your policy probably has limits on certain items. Typical limits are:

  • Cash - $200
  • Jewelry - $1,000
  • Firearms - $2,500
  • Silverware - $2,500

Check your policy carefully. If you see you don't have enough coverage, find out how much it would cost to increase those limits or to buy special coverage.

Optional Coverage
In addition to special coverage for jewelry, silverware and furs, you can purchase specific coverage for such possessions as stamp or coin collections, fine arts, camera equipment, collectibles, watercraft and musical instruments, just to name a few.


Life Insurance

Many financial experts consider life insurance to be the cornerstone of sound financial planning. It can be an important tool in the following situations:

   1. Replace income for dependents
if people depend on your income, life insurance can replace that income for them if you die. The most commonly recognized case of this is parents with young children. However, it can also apply to couples in which the survivor would be financially stricken by the income lost through the death of a partner, and to dependent adults, such as parents, siblings or adult children who continue to rely on you financially. Insurance to replace your income can be especially useful if the government- or employer-sponsored benefits of your surviving spouse or domestic partner will be reduced after your death.

   2.  Pay final expenses
Life insurance can pay your funeral and burial costs, probate and other estate administration costs, debts and medical expenses not covered by health insurance.

   3. Create an inheritance for your heirs
Even if you have no other assets to pass to your heirs, you can create an inheritance by buying a life insurance policy and naming them as beneficiaries.

   
   4.  Make significant charitable contributions
By making a charity the beneficiary of your life insurance, you can make a much larger contribution than if you donated the cash equivalent of the policy’s premiums.

    5.  Create a source of savings
some types of life insurance create a cash value that, if not paid out as a death benefit, can be borrowed or withdrawn on the owner’s request. Since most people make paying their life insurance policy premiums a high priority, buying a cash-value type policy can create a kind of “forced” savings plan. Furthermore, the interest credited is tax deferred (and tax exempt if the money is paid as a death claim).